How to string a fiddle

how to string a fiddle

How to tune a fiddle

Aug 02,  · In this video, I open my brand-new new fiddle, inspect it, and set it up. I talk about the different parts of the fiddle, and show you how to set up the stri. He starts by demonstrating that if you hold the fiddle parallel to the ground, the bow can rest on the strings. Then he breaks down some bow mechanics, showing you that, when bowing to the tip of the bow, if you extend your arm from the elbow, your bow will stay parallel to .

This pretty little A modal tune comes from West Virginia fiddler Lee Triplett and is now played by Celtic fiddlers, old-time fiddlers, and others. Chad talks about how the notes of how to string a fiddle melody relate to the chords that go with the tune and how some of the phrases outline the chords. Chad shows you his approach to playing bluegrass solos using this standard song with a very common chord progression.

Chad shows you the chord progression as well as a nice backup rhythm. Then he talks about his philosophy of improvising and shows you how he distills a tune down to its most basic elements, so that you can start playing around with the rhythm, varying the melody, etc. Learn a great way to improvise or play solos on bluesy bluegrass songs in the key of B. Chad starts by showing you the B minor pentatonic scale, which has the same notes as the D major pentatonic scale, and then shows you how to make a paper balloon origami instructions, by just changing the D natural note to Dyou get a great blues scale in the key of B major.

Chad gives you an example of how to improvise on the melody without thinking about the chord changes, and then how to improvise just using the E minor pentatonic scale.

It sounds traditional, but was written by Canadian fiddler Frankie Rodgers. Fiddlw has a fairly simple basic melody that everyone elaborates on in their own way. Chad also gives you some bowing tips and advice on string crossings and getting a solid tone on each note. Chad talks ho how he firms up the wrist of his bowing arm a bit to better fit the rhythm and feel of the tune.

Chad shows you how to tune to DDAD, how to add a steady pulse with the bow to the melody of the A part, which drone strings and double stops to play, and a few variations on the melody of the A part. He also gives you advice on giving a nice attack with your bow to the hammer-on and shows you how to anticipate the beginnings of phrases. Chad gives you advice on holding the fiddle and extending your bowing arm in this technique lesson.

He starts by demonstrating that if you hold the fiddle parallel to the ground, the bow can rest on the strings. Then he breaks down some bow mechanics, showing you that, when bowing to the tip of the bow, if you extend your arm how to string a fiddle the elbow, your bow will stay parallel to the bridge as it moves across the strings.

He also shows you how to bring your bowing arm in when you're bowing to the frog. It has an unusual melody that was written by Irish fiddler Tommie Potts, who meant tp to mimic a butterfly that he was watching in his garden. Chad walks you through each part slowly, showing you the bowing as he goes.

How to string a fiddle also shows you some ornaments you can use once you have the basic melody down. The tune has become popular in how to shorten follicular phase music circles lately, and Chad learned it from the fiddling of James Bryan. Chad also talks about getting an old-time tone by adding a little pressure to your bow and slowing it down a bit. He also shows you how you can play the tune in ADAE tuning, and how to adjust your fingering on go lowest string when you do.

Chad walks you through the melody fidd,e each part phrase by phrase, showing you his bowing as he goes. He also shows you the melody in the lower octave.

Then he walks you through the melody, phrase by phrase, showing fidle his bowing as he goes. Chad walks you through the melody, showing you how he articulates the bluesy slides and what does dreaming about snakes mean spiritually it with a swing phrasing.

Chad starts by reviewing the G natural minor scale in two octaves and playing the whole tune through. Chad walks you through the melody, phrase by phrase, showing you his bowing and how to add double-stringing below the melody. The second part has some long stretches up to the B note on the high E string, so Chad gives you advice on making the stretch. It includes some typical old-time anticipations and bow pulses or fjddle. Chad walks you through the tune, phrase by phrase, showing you his bowing and some of the ways he accents the melody and attacks notes in different ways.

Chad starts by showing the basic melody before showing you some of the fourth finger unison drones that give the tune its distinctive sound. It combines sounds from a lot of styles: old-time, bluegrass, How to use yahoo pipes, blues, and even Klezmer. In this case, the first and second parts each have how to root android tablet without pc extra half measure.

The third part has some typical sring bowing patterns with more slurs and bow sweeps. Chad walks you through the solo phrase by phrase, giving you advice on bowing and phrasing as he goes.

He also shows you a version of the solo with some drones and double stops. Chad walks you through the solo, phrase by phrase, first without double stops and then with them. Chad starts by showing you the basic melody and then how to add variations, including stding drones, blue notes, and an ending lick, to create a bluegrass fiddle solo. Chad starts by showing you the basic melody and words and then shows you how you can turn the melody into a solo with the addition of double stops.

String School. Gear, News, Performances. Start Course. About This Course. Learn basic fiddle techniques by learning popular traditional tunes, with lots of technique tips and advice on how to get that fiddley sound. Try a Sample Lesson. June Apple. In this lesson, Chad teaches you the popular old-time tune "June Apple," which is in the key of A Mixolydian. Mixolydian means that the seventh in the major scale in this case, G is lowered a half step to G. In the first part of the lesson, Chad teaches the A part of "June Apple" phrase by phrase and also shows you the "Nashville shuffle" bowing pattern, which works well on the A part of this tune.

Try a sample lesson. Over the years he has toured with many bluegrass greats such as J. Chad also finds great joy in teaching and working with all fiiddle of uow fiddle students. He and his wife, Catherine, teach more than a hundred students at their studio in Berkeley, California. Instructor Page. Peghead Nation is creating a library of accompaniment videos and downloadable MP3s for songs and tunes that are taught on the hwo, classics that you'll find at many jams and picking parties.

As a subscriber, you have access to this library and can use the tracks to practice playing tunes and songs at a slow or medium tempo with guitar accompaniment. New songs will be added regularly. Get started now! Use promo code ChadLand at checkout. Get started with these introductory technique lessons for both hands, with helpful exercises as well as essential advice on tuning and caring for your fiddle.

Care and Maintenance of Your Fiddle. Learn key tips for taking good care of your fiddle and bow, such as loosening the bow before you put it away, cleaning your strings, how much rosin to use, and more.

Tuning the Fiddle. Bow Technique. Bow technique is all about trying to get the tone you hear in your head into your fiddle. He also includes some call-and-response exercises that explore different bow tones.

Left-Hand Technique. Learn how best to position your left-hand on the fiddle, the difference between playing with the tips of the fingers versus the pads, and how much pressure to use to get the best tone. Learn some exercises for developing good vibrato technique, which should not be just a shake of your finger but very deliberate changes in pitch. Angeline the Baker.

Elk River Blues. Old Joe Clark. Whiskey Before Breakfast. Tennessee Waltz. Pretty Little Dog. Seneca Square Dance. Scales and Chords. Major Scales in Bluegrass Keys. Bury Me Fisdle the Willow. Bluegrass Stomp. Kentucky Waltz.

Clinch Mountain Backstep. Your Love Is Like a Flower. Down the Road. In these lessons, Chad talks about his philosophy of improvising with lots of concrete examples and exercises for coming up with variations on the melody, improvising on the chords, etc.

Improvising on a Blues. Improvising in B Modal. Blackberry Blossom. Red-Haired Striing. Ookpik Waltz. Star of the County Down. Lost Girl. Midnight on the Water. Salt Creek. San Antonio Rose. Cluck Old Hen.

Choosing new strings for a fiddle

Although the process is fairly straightforward, there are a few pitfalls to avoid! Familiarise yourself with the parts of the fiddle. Choosing new strings. Removing the old string. Putting on a new string. Tuning a new string. How often to replace a string. Changing a full set of strings. Notice the pegs, which each have a hole where string end threads through. The string is wound around the peg for several turns to hold it firmly in place. The peg box holds the four pegs in position.

Each has 4 notches, for keeping the 4 strings in position. There should be a tiny plastic sleeve round the e string where it sits on the bridge. As you look down onto the fingerboard from above, with the body of the fiddle closest to you, the fiddle is strung with the strings in this order: G D A E. Find out more about the different parts of a fiddle. If you need to replace a string, how do you know what sort of string to buy? The particular fiddle strings you choose will depend partly on your fiddle, and partly on your own preferences, regarding the sort of sound you like.

So how can you tell what brand those strings are? These refer to the end of the string which attaches near the tail piece of the fiddle. The names are very descriptive! Deciding which you need will depend on what type of adjusters if any you have on your fiddle.

You can find out more from this fiddle website. Inside the fiddle is a small post called the sound post. The sound post is held firmly in place by being wedged in between the front and back of the fiddle.

If all the strings are removed at the same time this pressure between front and back is is released, which leaves a risk that the sound post can easily fall over.

Putting new strings on a fiddle without the sound post in place is likely to cause the whole fiddle to implode and split the front of the fiddle! To remove the old string, unwind the string at the peg end while gently pulling on the string. After a few turns of the peg the string should come free.

You may also need to shoogle the string about a bit to pull the end out of the hole in the peg. You can then lift the ball end of the string free from the fine adjuster as well. Before putting the new string in check your fine adjuster. Take new string and make a right angled bend cm from the end.

This will help keep the string in place when you start winding it into the peg. Turn the peg so you can see the hole and thread the end of the string into the hole, up to the bend. Maintain a small amount of tension on the length of the string and start to turn the peg away from you. As you wind the peg round the string should wind neatly along the peg, towards the head of the peg.

Keeping a little tension on the string, check it for length — once it is an inch or so longer than you need slot the ball end in between the arms of the fine tuner. Make sure this is fully pushed home, otherwise it may pop out when you tighten up the string. This needs to sit in the slot on the bridge. The plastic sleeve protects the bridge from damage. The sleeve should be positioned so that it sits flush with the bridge and the excess is on the side near the fine adjusters.

Then use the fine adjuster to finish tuning it. A new string will stretch a lot over the first week or so, and will go flat as it stretches. There are several reasons you may want to change a fiddle string or a set of strings. As strings get old this thin wire becomes worn and can break.

It generally happens on the area of the string that the fingers fall on most often when playing. How often you change your fiddle strings depends on how often you play. As a very rough rule of thumb, change them at least once a year. If you were to remove all the fiddle strings at the same time this tension on the face of the fiddle would be released, which runs the risk of dislodging the sound post. If the soundpost moves at all it will affect the sound of your fiddle.

If it falls over, putting strings back on risks cracking the fiddle as you tighten the strings. The fiddle bridge is also held in place by the tension of the strings. You can also minimise the risk of problems by with the sound post moving by laying your fiddle on a flat surface to change the strings.

If you look at the bridge from the side, it should be sitting vertically on the face of the fiddle. When you tune a string using either the fine adjusters or the pegs, the string tightens and pulls on the top edge of the bridge to some degree.

Tuning from the peg end has a much greater effect than tuning from the fine adjusters. So if you replace all the strings at once, there is a risk that the top edge of the bridge will be pulled over towards the pegs as you adjust the tuning of each string. As you look down onto the fingerboard from above, with the body of the fiddle closest to you, the fiddle is strung with the strings in this order: G D A E Find out more about the different parts of a fiddle Choosing new strings for a fiddle If you need to replace a string, how do you know what sort of string to buy?

Playing more often will help to stretch the new string. How often should you replace your fiddle strings? Occasionally an individual string may snap completely.



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